How to Grow Coriander

Botanical Name: Coriandrum Sativum

Coriander originates from the Mediterranean and Asian regions. It is an herb with fresh, citrusy leaves (cilantro) and small, round seeds (coriander seeds) used extensively in cooking for it’s distinctive flavour and aroma.

Do you want to know how to grow coriander? If so, let’s dive in.

  • How to Grow Coriander
  • How to Grow Coriander
Planting Guide Image

Coriander Planting Guide

Method

Direct

Sowing Depth

6 mm

Season

Mild

Germination

15 – 25°C

Hardiness / Life Cycle

Perennial

Row Spacing

60cm

Plant Spacing

10 – 15cm

Position

Moderate Sun

Days Until Maturity

30 – 40 Days

Storage

Store dried in an airtight container. Chop and freeze in ice cubes.

When to Plant Coriander in Australia

What growing
region am I in?
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Cool Plantable in Jan Plantable in Feb Plantable in Mar Plantable in Apr Plantable in Oct Plantable in Nov Plantable in Dec
Temperate Plantable in Jan Plantable in Feb Plantable in Mar Plantable in Apr Plantable in May Plantable in Sep Plantable in Oct Plantable in Nov Plantable in Dec
Sub-Tropical Plantable in Apr Plantable in May Plantable in Jun Plantable in Jul Plantable in Aug Plantable in Sep
Tropical Plantable in Mar Plantable in Apr Plantable in May Plantable in Jun
Arid Plantable in Mar Plantable in Apr Plantable in May
Cool Temperate Sub-Tropical Tropical Arid
Jan Plantable in Jan Plantable in Jan
Feb Plantable in Feb Plantable in Feb
Mar Plantable in Mar Plantable in Mar Plantable in Mar Plantable in Mar
Apr Plantable in Apr Plantable in Apr Plantable in Apr Plantable in Apr Plantable in Apr
May Plantable in May Plantable in May Plantable in May Plantable in May
Jun Plantable in Jun Plantable in Jun
Jul Plantable in Jul
Aug Plantable in Aug
Sep Plantable in Sep Plantable in Sep
Oct Plantable in Oct Plantable in Oct
Nov Plantable in Nov Plantable in Nov
Dec Plantable in Dec Plantable in Dec
What growing
region am I in?

Growing Coriander

Coriander, the divisive herb that you either love, or hate with a raging passion! It is also known as cilantro or Chinese parsley, is a popular herb used in various cuisines for its fresh and vibrant flavour. Growing coriander in your own garden or indoor space allows you to have a continuous supply of this aromatic herb at your fingertips.

In this comprehensive guide, we will take you through the process of growing coriander in Australia, providing you with essential tips and techniques. Whether you have a garden or limited space in pots, you can enjoy the benefits of growing coriander and enhance your culinary creations.

When to Plant Coriander in Australia

The optimal time to plant coriander in Australia depends on the specific region and climate. Coriander prefers cooler temperatures and does well in mild weather. In warm weather you’ll want to find a spot shaded from the midday sun.

Here are some general guidelines for different regions in Australia:

 

  • Tropical and Subtropical Regions: In these areas, coriander can be planted during the cooler months, typically from March to September.

 

  • Temperate Regions: In temperate regions, coriander can be planted during autumn and spring, avoiding the hottest and coldest months.

 

  • Cool and Alpine Regions: In cooler areas, coriander can be planted during spring and autumn, avoiding extreme temperatures.

 

It’s important to note that coriander is a fast-growing herb, so successive plantings every few weeks can ensure a continuous harvest throughout the growing season.

How to Grow Coriander in Pots

Growing coriander in pots is a convenient option, especially for those with limited space or urban gardens. Here’s how you can do it:

 

  1. Pot Selection: Choose a pot or container that is at least 20 cm (8 inches) deep to accommodate the coriander’s root system. Ensure the container has drainage holes to prevent waterlogging.

 

2.Potting Mix: Use a well-draining potting mix with added organic matter. Fill the pot, leaving about an inch of space below the rim.

 

3.Sowing Seeds: Sow coriander seeds directly into the potting mix, spacing them about 5-7 cm (2-3 inches) apart. Cover the seeds lightly with a thin layer of soil.

 

4.Sunlight and Temperature: Place the pot in a location that receives partial sun to full sun, ideally getting 4-6 hours of sunlight each day. Coriander thrives in temperatures between 15-25°C (59-77°F).

 

5.Watering: Keep the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged. Water the potting mix whenever the top inch of soil feels dry. Avoid overwatering, as it can lead to root rot.

 

6.Harvesting: As the coriander plants grow, you can start harvesting the leaves when they reach a usable size. Harvest from the outside leaves, leaving the centre leaves to continue growing..

How To Grow Coriander Indoors

Growing coriander indoors allows you to enjoy fresh herbs year-round, regardless of the outdoor climate. Here’s how you can grow coriander indoors:

 

  1. Container Selection: Choose a deep container or pot with drainage holes to avoid water accumulation. Ensure the container fits well on a windowsill or in an area with adequate sunlight.

 

2.Potting Mix: Fill the container with a well-draining potting mix, enriched with organic matter. Leave about an inch of space below the rim.

 

3.Sowing Seeds: Scatter coriander seeds evenly across the soil surface, pressing them gently into the soil. Space the seeds about 5-7 cm (2-3 inches) apart.

 

4.Sunlight and Temperature: Place the container in a location that receives bright, indirect sunlight. Coriander requires a minimum of 4-6 hours of sunlight each day. Maintain temperatures between 15-25°C (59-77°F).

 

5.Watering: Water the soil thoroughly after sowing the seeds and keep the soil consistently moist. Water whenever the top inch of soil feels dry. Avoid overwatering to prevent root rot.

 

6.Harvesting: As the coriander plants grow, you can start harvesting the leaves when they are of usable size. Trim the outer leaves, allowing the centre leaves to continue growing. This will encourage bushier growth.

How To Grow Coriander From Roots

An interesting way to grow coriander is from coriander roots that are typically discarded. Here’s how you can do it:

 

  1. Coriander Root Selection: Choose coriander bunches with intact roots. Look for fresh, healthy roots that show no signs of rot or damage.

 

2.Root Preparation: Trim the coriander leaves, leaving about 2-3 cm (0.8-1.2 inches) of stem attached to the roots. Place the roots in a glass or container with water, ensuring the roots are submerged.

 

3.Water Change: Change the water daily to prevent any bacterial growth and maintain the freshness of the roots.

 

4.Root Growth: After a few days, you should notice new roots growing from the base of the coriander roots. Continue changing the water daily.

 

5.Transplanting: Once the roots have grown to about 5-7 cm (2-3 inches) in length, transfer the coriander roots to a pot or container with a well-draining potting mix. Plant the roots, covering them with soil, leaving the crown of the plant just above the soil surface.

 

6.Watering and Care: Water the newly transplanted coriander roots thoroughly and keep the soil consistently moist. Place the container in a location that receives partial sun to full sun.

 

7.Harvesting: As the coriander plants grow, you can start harvesting the leaves when they have reached a usable size. Trim the outer leaves, allowing the centre leaves to continue growing.

How To Grow Coriander In Water

Growing coriander in water is a simple and easy way to enjoy fresh coriander all year round. Here’s how to grow coriander in water:

  1. Cut a few stems of fresh coriander and remove the lower leaves, leaving about 2-5cm  of stem at the bottom.
  2. Place the stems in a jar or container filled with water. Make sure the bottom of the stems are submerged in the water, but not the leaves.
  3. Place the jar or container in a sunny location, such as a windowsill or balcony.
  4. Change the water every few days to prevent bacterial growth and ensure the stems have access to oxygen.
  5. Within a week or two, roots should start to grow from the bottom of the stems.
  6. Once the roots are about 2-5cm long, you can transplant the coriander into soil or continue to grow it in water.

 

If you decide to transplant the coriander into soil, fill a pot with well-draining potting soil and make a hole for the stem. Gently place the stem and roots into the hole and cover with soil. Water the soil well and keep it moist but not waterlogged. Place the pot in a sunny location and continue to care for the coriander as you would for any other herb.

Growing coriander in water is a great way to have fresh herbs on hand for cooking, and it can also be a fun project for kids to watch the roots grow.

How To Grow Coriander In 3 Days

If you’re in a hurry and need fresh coriander quickly, you can use a technique called pre-soaking to encourage faster germination. Here’s how:

 

  1. Pre-Soaking: Place the coriander seeds in a small bowl or container. Cover the seeds with warm water and let them soak for 24 hours.

 

2.Seed Planting: After the soaking period, sow the pre-soaked coriander seeds directly into well-prepared soil or pots. Plant them at a depth of about 1 cm (0.4 inches) and cover lightly with soil.

 

3.Watering: Water the soil gently after sowing the pre-soaked seeds, ensuring the soil is evenly moist. Continue to water whenever the top inch of soil feels dry.

 

4.Sunlight and Temperature: Place the planted seeds in a warm, well-lit area that receives ample sunlight. Maintain temperatures between 15-25°C (59-77°F) for optimal growth.

 

5.Quick Harvesting: Due to the pre-soaking technique, you should see coriander seedlings emerging within three days. You can start harvesting the leaves when they have grown to a usable size.